O.W.L.S Magical Readathon 2020

This April, I am participating in the Magical Readathon hosted by G at @book_roast. The readathon starts April 1st and ends April 30th. This is my first time participating in the challenge and I am super excited about it. At least this way, I get to tackle a few books off my TBR list.

The career I chose to persue is Magizoologist.

Go check it out here
and you can look at all the possible career choices here.
I hope you have a blast!

Astronomy—Night Classes: read majority of this book when it’s dark outside

Synopsis
Since his first collection, Nightshift, published thirty-five years ago, Stephen King has dazzled readers with his genius as a writer of short fiction. In this new collection he assembles, for the first time, recent stories that have never been published in a book. He introduces each with a passage about its origins or his motivations for writing it.

There are thrilling connections between stories; themes of morality, the afterlife, guilt, what we would do differently if we could see into the future or correct the mistakes of the past. “Afterlife” is about a man who died of colon cancer and keeps reliving the same life, repeating his mistakes over and over again. Several stories feature characters at the end of life, revisiting their crimes and misdemeanors. Other stories address what happens when someone discovers that he has supernatural powers—the columnist who kills people by writing their obituaries in “Obits;” the old judge in “The Dune” who, as a boy, canoed to a deserted island and saw names written in the sand, the names of people who then died in freak accidents. In “Morality,” King looks at how a marriage and two lives fall apart after the wife and husband enter into what seems, at first, a devil’s pact they can win.

Magnificent, eerie, utterly compelling, these stories comprise one of King’s finest gifts to his constant reader—“I made them especially for you,” says King. “Feel free to examine them, but please be careful. The best of them have teeth.”

Care of Magical Creatures— Hippogriffs: creature with a beak on the cover

Synopsis
Ketterdam: a bustling hub of international trade where anything can be had for the right price—and no one knows that better than criminal prodigy Kaz Brekker. Kaz is offered a chance at a deadly heist that could make him rich beyond his wildest dreams. But he can’t pull it off alone. . . .

A convict with a thirst for revenge

A sharpshooter who can’t walk away from a wager

A runaway with a privileged past

A spy known as the Wraith

A Heartrender using her magic to survive the slums

A thief with a gift for unlikely escapes


Kaz’s crew is the only thing that might stand between the world and destruction—if they don’t kill each other first.

Charms— Lumos (Daxima: white cover)

Synopsis
Her dad is drowning in grief. He’s also the only one who has been able to see and hear her since the accident. But now she’s got a mystery to solve, a mystery that will hopefully remind her detective father that he is still alive, that there is a life after Beth that is still worth living.

Who is Isobel Catching, and why is she able to see Beth, too? What is her connection to the crime Beth’s father has been sent to investigate–a gruesome fire at a home for troubled youth that left an unidentifiable body behind? What happened to the people who haven’t been seen since the fire?

As Beth and her father unravel the mystery, they find a shocking and heartbreaking story lurking beneath the surface of a small town, and a friendship that lasts beyond one life and into another…

Herbology— (I)mbulus mimbletonia: title starts with an I

Synopsis
Ed Kennedy is an underage cabdriver without much of a future. He’s pathetic at playing cards, hopelessly in love with his best friend, Audrey, and utterly devoted to his coffee-drinking dog, the Doorman. His life is one of peaceful routine and incompetence until he inadvertently stops a bank robbery.

That’s when the first ace arrives in the mail.

That’s when Ed becomes the messenger.

Chosen to care, he makes his way through town helping and hurting (when necessary) until only one question remains: Who’s behind Ed’s mission?

Muggle Studies— Book from a perspective of a muggle (contemporary)

Synopsis

Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon—the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him “the bitter neighbor from hell.” But must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

Will you be joining the Magical Readathon of 2020?

Stargirl

“She laughed when there was no joke. She danced when there was no music. She had no friends, yet she was the friendliest person in school. In her answers in class, she often spoke of sea horses and stars, but she did not know what a football was… She was elusive. She was today. She was tomorrow. She was the faintest scent of a cactus flower, the flitting shadow of an elf owl. We did not know what to make of her. In our minds we tried to pin her to a cork board like a butterfly, but the pin merely went through and away she flew.”

– Jerry Spinelli, Stargirl

You know the type of stories that take hold of your hand and pull you right in? It is as if it is saying, “Yes, yes, I know who you are. Come in, come in, settle down, make yourself comfortable.” And as soon as you start, it’s as if you were there all along, all cozied up. Stargirl is that type of story. As soon as I knocked on its door, I just couldn’t stop. Just one more chapter. The character of Stargirl is one my favorite characters. She’s always out there, being our inner us. Dancing in the rain during school hours, singing Happy Birthday songs during lunch hour, cheering for the opposite team during games or even caring when someone from the opposite team gets hurt. She shows that she is just a human being. Her caring nature shines through so much that she does not see that there are “social rules” that everyone follows. To be honest, she reminds me of Luna Lovegood from Harry Potter. Luna also didn’t have a lot of friends because everyone thought that she was so out there, but those that took the time to understand her, became some of her closest and dearest friends.

I have a love and hate relationship with Leo, the male protagonist in this story. He supports Stargirl when they are to themselves but abandons her when his peers isolate him from everything. Although I do feel sorry for him when Stargirl leaves; he realizes too late of what really mattered. But, as the years passed by, he seems to have picked up some of Stargirl’s quirks such as dropping a quarter in the street, walking in the rain without an umbrella, reading the newspaper all over, etc. But in the end he knows that he is not alone and that just like he did not forget about her, she did not forget about him.  Because a day before his birthday, he received a gift-wrapped package in the mail. It was a porcupine necktie.

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close 

“He would have told me the story of the Sixth Borough, from the voice in the can at the end to the beginning, from ‘I love you’ to ‘Once upon a time…’ We would have been safe.”

-Jonathan Safran Foer, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close

This book was a great read as well as a great journey. I wasn’t able to finish it in one sitting, or two or three for that matter. The words are dense and heavy. The thought processes are constant and ongoing. Sometimes, there’s too much to take in. I found myself going back and forth between sentences trying to keep up with their thoughts. But that’s what I kind of like about this book. It tells it how it is, how Oscar, grandma, and The Renter are thinking, even if they’re rambling. I liked the pictures residing in between the pages, the story of the sixth borough, the can with the voice inside that said “I Love You”, the need to stop inventing, and burying all your love and regrets six feet underground. Although the key had nothing to do with Oscar’s father, I loved how his connection to it helped Oscar come to terms with his father’s death. It wasn’t something I was quite expecting 😊.

Aside

Tsundoku 

(n.; Japanese) the act of buying a book and leaving it unread, often piled together with other unread books. 

Going through this phase right now. Except for the fact that my pile is full of wanted books that I’ve wanted to read for a long time. But I’m running out of time to finish them before the semester starts again 😞

Currently I’m finishing “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close” and “The Night Circus” off on the side. But I’m wondering if I should ditch the latter and adopt “In the time of the Butterflies” (which I’ve already read) instead. Well, I guess I shouldn’t be unfair to it. I’ve only started the book so let me see how far I can be reeled in. If not, there’s always the unwanted pile, or in its case, back to the library.

The Kite Runner

For you, a thousand times over.  – Khaled Hosseini, The Kite Runner

The Kite Runner. It is my first time reading this book, and I wondered why it took me so long to pick it up and start reading it. In all honesty, I guess I just wasn’t ready. It was not just for this book. I wasn’t ready to start reading for myself again. You know, the type of reading where you are curled up in your favorite place with a book in hand. The type of reading where you just read without taking a break except for eating and going to the bathroom.

I guess college kind of ruined that for me. I read because I had to. Otherwise, I wouldn’t be of much use in lectures and I wouldn’t be able to complete my assignments. It got really bad when I had 5 classes together and I was reading 4-5 different books each night, constantly trying to get through pages and pages of reading. That really killed my interest for reading books for entertainment. But I won’t say I regretted having to read those books back to back because I learned how to manage my time well. As an English major, I really learned how to read in between the lines. Now sometimes, even though I don’t try to, I start analyzing the book as I read it. And sometimes I stop myself and ask,  ‘What in the world am I doing? Just read.’.

So, this is the first book that I’ve picked up for reading for fun. And what a book it is. It’s about love, friendship, family, hatred, the inner mind. It made me smile. It made me cry. Khaled Hosseini did a marvelous job. Not only did he capture the moment of which he writes, but he also captures the reader’s attention so well that the reader can’t help but to absorb every little detail of this captivating story. I have to say, my most favorite character is Hassan. His friendliness, his loyalty, his personality really touched my heart. If I am ever blessed with such friends as him, I wouldn’t give them up for the world. And Amir, he’s okay. Although there were some things that I disliked about him, I understand that he was just a kid at that time and so his feeling are understandable. I know that if he was told about the secret, he would have protected Hassan with his life. In all, this book is an awesome read and I would definitely recommend it to anyone who is looking for a good book to read (or re-read).