Tsundoku (n.)

tsun•do•ku  [tsun-doh-ku]
(n.) from Japanese- the act of leaving a book unread after buying it, typically piled up together with other unread books.

I do have the habit of being a Tsundoku  。(*^▽^*)ゞ  I bought all these but never seemed to actually read them or I may have started, but didn’t get all the way through.

  1. Children of the Lamp: The Akhenaten Adventure by Philip Kerr

     

I didn’t actually buy this one. Baba drove by a book sale the other day and thought I might like it. So, he bought it for me. Thank you baba! ♡〜٩(^▿^)۶〜♡ He knows me so well. Apparently, this book is the first book of its series and it is about a pair of twins stumbling upon the world of djinns. Oooh, can’t wait to crack this book open.

  1. Fantastic Beasts and Where To Find Them by J.K. Rowling

I know, I know. Usually I’m quick to gobble up HP related books, but this one came amid my student teaching and grad classes. So… it got put off the side. On the plus point, I did start it though.

  1. Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Actually, I finished this right after I took this picture. I had finished a third of the book when I had stopped reading it. After I picked it up again, I ended up staying the entire night to finish the book. Now I can relate with people who has already read it ^^”

  1. The Zoo Keeper’s Wife by Diana Ackerman

I became intrigued after I saw the movie trailer actually. I’m all for a good Holocaust related story. I believe that each Holocaust story is just one piece of a whole story. I like hearing and experiencing the different stories out there. I did take it to Bangladesh when I visited, but it never peaked my interest to just sit down down and read in the hustle and bustle.

  1. Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

I picked this up at my local library. They’re always having a book sale. You can get three paperbacks for a dollar! I’m currently reading this one now, after finishing Wonder.

  1. The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

I never got the chance to read this. That’s the disadvantage of going to Barnes and Nobles… the books call you over, you buy them, and now they’re sitting on your shelf intend of theirs.

  1. Billy Creekmore by Tracey Porter

This book was on sale at the school I student taught at. It looked interesting so I did it.        I bought it    m(_ _;;m

  1. The Mysterious Benedict Society by Trenton Lee Stewart

I also bought this at the above book sale mentioned above. But, I promise, I’ll get to this one soon. This year, no new books until I finish all these first.

A Trouvaille

Look what I found whilst cleaning out my room…

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Frankenstein by Mary Shelley

I read this book along with Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice for my capstone course, Studies in Romanticism, in my senior year of college. Using these two books for my thesis, I argued that subjectivity is rooted in knowledge in both Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein and Jane Austen’s Pride and Prejudice and that both authors depict knowledge differently. I successfully argued that Shelley depicts knowledge negatively by showing how Victor Frankenstein’s pursuit of power leads to his tragedy. While, on the other hand, Austen depicts knowledge positively by showing that Elizabeth Bennett’s self-awareness leads to felicity.

At that time, we were required to write at least 15 pages for which I was a tad bit worried. I did not know if my topic would be able to span that long. So when I started to formulate how I was going to about it, I started making an outline. I love outlines! They help me focus. They don’t only help me focus, they help students focus. I used outlines to help 5th grade students collect their thoughts as they started to write 4-5 paragraph essays. And they loved it because now they knew where they were going with their topic. Anyways, I started to make an outline and I worked on it, added to it, and perfected it for about a month and a half. See, for me, I don’t start to put anything on paper until I have some sort of content going for me. If you give me a blank piece of paper, I won’t even touch it until I am sure of what I am going to put on that paper. I may write over, scratch, and tear my outline paper to shreds, but I will never touch that blank piece of paper until I have something solid. And you better believe that I made use of that outline. Lines and arrows filled the entire page as sentences climbed up the sides. For each new point I made, I assigned it a number which represented a page. When I was satisfied with what I had, I started writing. For me, writing is an active process. When I started writing, I knew that from my outline I would not be able to come up with 15 pages of solid writing alone. But I knew that along the way, I would be able to come up with content that is relevant to my topic. And boy! was I on fire! I had submerged myself deep into my writing. From arguments that I had previously made, new arguments arose. And just as I had done with my outline, I was working my way through my paper. This was my canvas at that moment and I was working my way towards perfecting it. I wrote 16 pages in three days. All that work payed off because I received an A+ on that paper 🙂 .